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Kinoite
Current inventory:  0 gems
 

Kinoite

  
Kinoite was named for Italian Jesuit missionary Fr. Eusebio Francisco Kino (1645-1711), pioneer/explorer of the Sonora-Arizona-California frontier.

Discovered in 1969; IMA status: Valid (IMA approved 1970)

 

Chemistry

 

 

Chemical Formula:

Ca2Cu2Si3O8(OH)4  or  Ca2Cu2Si3O10 2H2O

 

Calcium Copper Silicate Hydroxide   or  Hydrated Calcium Copper Silicate

Molecular Weight:

487.53 gm

Composition:

Calcium

16.44 %

Ca

23.00 %

CaO

 

Copper

26.07 %

Cu

32.63 %

CuO

 

Silicon

17.28 %

Si

36.97 %

SiO2

 

Hydrogen

0.83 %

H

7.39 %

H2O

 

Oxygen

39.38 %

O

 

 

 

 

100.00 %

 

100.00 %

= TOTAL OXIDE

 

 

Classification

   

   

Mineral Classification:

Silicates (Germanates)

Strunz 8th Ed. ID:

8/C.31-10

Nickel-Strunz 10th Ed. ID:

9.BH.10

 

9 : SILICATES (Germanates)
B : Sorosilicates
H : Sorosilicates with Si
3O10, Si4O11, etc. anions; cations in tetrahedral [4] and greater coordination

Related to:

None

Varieties:

None

Synonyms:

IMA1969-037

 

 

Crystal Data

   

   

Crystallography:

Monoclinic - Prismatic

Crystal Habit:

As well-formed crystals, to 1.5 mm, tabular on [100], somewhat elongated along [001]; also in veinlets, massive.

Twinning:

None

 

 

Physical Properties

   

 

Cleavage:

Excellent on {010}; distinct on {100} and {001}

Fracture:

n/a

Tenacity:

Brittle

Moh's Hardness:

4.0 - 5.0

Density:

3.13 - 3.19 (g/cm3)

Luminescence:

Not Fluorescent

Radioactivity:

Not Radioactive

 

 

Optical Properties

   

   

Color:

Light to deep azure-blue

Transparency:

Transparent to Translucent

Luster:

Vitreous

Refractive Index:

1.638 - 1.676  Biaxial ( - ) 

Birefringence:

0.038

Dispersion:

Distinct to relatively weak; r < v

Pleochroism:

Strong; X = pale greenish blue; Y = blue; Z = deep blue

 

 

Occurances

   

   

Geological Setting:

In vugs and veinlets in skarn (Santa Rita Mountains, Arizona, USA); in amygdules in basaltic lava flows (Calumet, Michigan, USA).

Common Associations:

Apophyllite, Copper (Santa Rita Mountains, Arizona, USA); Quartz, Calcite, Copper, Silver, Epidote, Pumpellyite, Chlorite (Calumet, Michigan, USA).

Common Impurities:

Mg

Type Locality:

Santa Rita Mountains, Pima County, Arizona, USA

Year Discovered:

1969; IMA approved 1970

View mineral photos:

Kinoite Mineral Photos and Locations

 

 

More Information

   

   

 

Mindat.org
Webmineral.com

 

 


Kinoite is a fairly rare copper mineral that is found in only a few localities around the world. Some of the best specimens come from the Christmas mine in Gila County, Arizona. It is often associated and coated with small crystals of
Apophyllite which can give a specimen a very nice sparkle. Cyrstals are very small, usually only about 1.5 mm, so the only gems available are druzy style cabochons. Massive examples of Kinoite may be a lighter blue color while minute, individual crystals may be a darker color similar to Azurite or Linarite. Kinoite is also found as very small rosette crystals that may be similar in appearance to clusters of Cavansite. Kinoite is also strongly pleochroic showing colors from pale blue or pale greenish blue to deep blue.

Distribution: In the USA, in Arizona, between Helvetia and Rosemont, Santa Rita Mountains, Pima County, and in the Christmas copper mine, Gila County; in the Bawana mine, about six km northwest of Milford, Beaver County, Utah; and in Michigan, in the Laurium and La Salle mines, Calumet, Houghton County and at the Northwestern mine, Keweenaw County. In Japan in the Fuka mine, Bitchu-cho (Bicchu-cho), Takahashi City, Okayama Prefecture, Chugoku Region, Honshu Island.
 

  
Kinoite gems for sale:

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